IBB Director Lobo Joins DG5 in Condemning Censorship

IBB Director Richard Lobo, center, and VOA Director David Ensor, upper right, meet with international broadcasters in Berlin.

International Broadcasting Bureau Director Richard Lobo and Voice of America Director David Ensor met with their international broadcasting colleagues from six other nations recently in Berlin to discuss and promote information freedom.

The session yielded a statement condemning nations that pursue censorship in violation of the Universal Declaration of Human rights and its embrace of freedom of opinion and expression. It specifically cited China, Iran, Syria and other governments in Eurasia, Africa, the Middle East and Latin American that seek to “control what their own citizens can see, hear and read.”

“Many of these actions, including intentional jamming of satellites, violate international regulations. We condemn them without reservation,” the group said.

Here is the entire statement:

We, the representatives ofAudiovisuel Extérieur de la France (AEF), Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) [Australia], British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) [United Kingdom], Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG) [US], Deutsche Welle (DW) [Germany], Nippon Hoso Kyokai (NHK) [Japan] and Radio Netherlands Worldwide (RNW), have met in Berlin to discuss common concerns.

We find international journalism is facing unprecedented challenges from countries that seek to deny their own citizens access to information from outside their borders in violation of Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which states:

“Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.”

We call upon the world’s nations to strengthen their commitment to Article 19 and to support expanded opportunities to share information across borders through digital and mobile technologies.
Yet we note with dismay that certain governments continue to control the flow of information. For example, China routinely blocks the Web and social media sites of our broadcasters and jams our shortwave signals, or Iran and Syria interfere with the satellite signals that carry our programs. Governments in Eurasia, Africa, the Middle East and Latin America also seek to control what their own citizens can see, hear and read.
Many of these actions, including intentional jamming of satellites, violate international regulations. We condemn them without reservation.

We also call attention to troubling new challenges to free expression. Some governments are seeking to enact far-reaching telecommunications regulations to stymie free speech.

At the World Conference on International Telecommunication (WICT) in Dubai, representatives of the world’s nations have considered telecommunications rules that might explicitly apply to the Internet for the first time.
We cast a wary eye on such efforts to control the Internet, and we denounce efforts to identify and track Internet users in order to stifle free expression, inquiry and political activity.

We have agreed to increase, whenever possible, our support for efforts to circumvent Web censorship through the use of new and innovative hardware and software tools. We also agreed to increase our advocacy for Internet freedom.

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