Libby Liu, President, RFA

Libby Liu was named president of RFA in September 2005 by the Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG), following the retirement of RFA’s founding president Richard Richter.

As president, Ms. Liu provides strategic and operational direction to meet RFA’s mission of providing balanced, objective news to listeners in East Asian countries where such news is unavailable. In addition to directing editorial and administrative policies and procedures, she coordinates issues in these areas with the BBG, the International Broadcasting Bureau, and other associated entities. Ms. Liu served previously as vice president for administration and finance, from 2003-05.

As president, Ms. Liu’s responsibilities include ensuring the highest quality administrative and technical support to the editorial staff. In this capacity, she works to facilitate effective, timely communication and broad-based collaboration among all divisions and bureaus.

Prior to joining RFA, she served as director of administration and strategic planning at the Baltimore-based National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), where she played a pivotal role in implementing the NAACP’s Five-Year Strategic Plan Goals and Objectives.

Earlier, she served as director of human resources with the high-tech firm Spyrus Inc. based in San Jose, Calif., and as assistant district attorney in the San Francisco District Attorney’s office, where she prosecuted felonies.

Ms. Liu’s earlier positions in private practice—at Morrison & Foerster in San Francisco and at Proskauer Rose Goetz & Mendelsohn in New York—focused on labor and employment law. From 1986-1989, Ms. Liu was a senior consultant at Coopers & Lybrand, now Price Waterhouse Coopers, in Washington, DC.

She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of California-Berkeley, an MBA from The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, and a J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania.

A California native, Ms. Liu is the daughter of Chinese immigrants and she has traveled widely in East Asia.”